Tag Archive: DVD/Bluray


This movie is so dang good

Mad Max: Fury Road: When people look back at the summer of 2015, they’ll remember it primarily for two things. The first is Jurassic World’s record-devouring-release, which shocked everyone as it kept climbing higher and higher into record books. The second is that’s when the world was gifted with Mad Max: Fury Road

You may be tired… Continue reading New on DVD/Blu-ray: 'Mad Max: Fury Road' Still Stuns on the Small Screen

A true must-see movie

Citizenfour: The story of Edward Snowden is a complicated one, but regardless if you think he’s a hero, a patriot, a traitor, or some combination of all three, you owe it to yourself to see Citizenfour. This is a nuanced, measured, infinitely insightful look at one of the most important news events of the last several years. 

However, what… Continue reading New on DVD/Blu-ray: 'Citizenfour,' 'Big Game,' 'The Last Dragon' and More

Do not deny its glory

Hackers: For most people Hackers is a guilty pleasure movie, the kind they enjoy ironically and make fun of with friends. Not me. There’s no guilt with how much I genuinely love this movie. I’m also not dumb. I understand completely why people think it’s a big joke, but everything they knock is an aspect I love.

For… Continue reading New on DVD/Blu-ray: Happy 20th Anniversary, 'Hackers'!

Since it’s been a slow two weeks for new home video, we’re combining them together.

One of the best of the year

What We Do In The Shadows

Directed by: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi

What We Do In The Shadows is one of the best movies of the year. I realize I already said that in the sub header here, but… Continue reading New on DVD/Blu-ray: 'What We Do In The Shadows,' 'The Water Diviner,' 'Burying the Ex' and More

A new sci-fi classic

Ex Machina: Ex Machina is perhaps one of the most challenging science fiction movies in recent years, not because it contains some kind of Primer-esque plot that’s going to require charts and diagrams to figure out, but because so much of the movie is affected by what baggage and preconceived notions the audience brings to it. On the surface the directorial debut of Alex Garland (who wrote Dredd, Never