Drive (+ UltraViolet Digital Copy) [Blu-ray]

Drive (+ UltraViolet Digital Copy) [Blu-ray]

– click on the image below for more information.

Drive (+ UltraViolet Digital Copy) [Blu-ray]

Ryan Gosling stars as a Hollywood stunt driver for movies by day and moonlights as a wheelman for criminals by night. Though a loner by nature, “Driver” can’t help falling in love with his beautiful neighbor Irene (Carey Mulligan), a young mother dragged into a dangerous underworld by the return of her ex-convict husband. After a heist goes wrong, Driver finds himself driving defense for the girl he loves, tailgated by a syndicate of deadly serious criminals (Albert Brooks and Ron Perlman)

Drive (+ UltraViolet Digital Copy) [Blu-ray]

Click on the button for more information and reviews.

Top MOvie Today

3 thoughts on “Drive (+ UltraViolet Digital Copy) [Blu-ray]

  1. 8 of 10 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Check your expectations at the door!, January 19, 2012
    By 
    Jason Kleeberg “J. Kleeberg” (Bay Area, California) –
      

    This review is from: Drive (DVD)

    I went into Drive not knowing what to expect, but I’ll admit – based on the plot summary and the poster, I was expecting an action movie. However, this was not the case, and I was pleasantly surprised.

    It’s a slower, methodical movie with fantastic bursts of exploitative violence. The acting is terrific, the direction is fantastic, and the sound (I watched it in a theater with awesome quality) is amazing.

    Check your expectations at the door – this is not Fast Five – and enjoy the ride.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? 


    |

    Comment Comment

  2. 36 of 48 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    If Drive wins no awards, awards have no meaning, December 12, 2011
    By 
    Nightmare Man (Memphis, TN USA) –

    This review is from: Drive (+ UltraViolet Digital Copy) [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)

    What a stylish and beautiful, yet uncompromising and unrelenting drama. It is a violent crime tale, but it is also a love story of rare restraint and deeply moving selflessness. Ryan Gosling deserves a best actor nomination, Albert Brooks a best supporting actor nod. The film itself is entirely deserving of best picture recognition. And the director, I hope, has not exhausted his creative energies with this remarkable effort, because he appears entirely unswayed by the shallow and formulaic conventions of today’s cinema. And the music … well, Oscars have been handed out to scores not half as good as this.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? 


    |

    Comment Comments (4)

  3. 72 of 85 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An Art-House Actioner That Blends Indie Cool With Mainstream Appeal: Watch Out For Spoilers And Enjoy The Ride, December 2, 2011
    By 
    K. Harris “Film aficionado” (Albuquerque, NM) –
      

      

      

    This review is from: Drive (DVD)

    In a year in which Ryan Gosling could do no wrong from romantic comedy (Crazy, Stupid, Love) to political drama (The Ides of March) to this art house actioner–“Drive” stands as the apex of his career-changing film streak. I have, for many years, declared Gosling perhaps the best actor of his generation. Ever since he burst onto the film scene in the controversial “The Believer,” Gosling has eschewed being a mainstream “star.” Heck, after “The Notebook,” another actor might have taken a very different career path. But Gosling, despite a couple of disappointing forays into big budget Hollywood, has remained true to his indie roots. Until now, that is. This year, he seamlessly blended indie cool with mainstream appeal. Of course, in “Drive” he found the perfect filmmaker and artistic collaborator in Danish auteur Nicolas Winding Refn. The two began a very public bromance and have already embarked on their next film project (2012’s Only God Forgives). Winding Refn is an ultra-cool writer/director whose resume is populated by some of my favorite international hits, and he picked up the Cannes Best Director prize for this. If you are unfamiliar with his work, I strongly suggest you invest in “The Pusher” trilogy–a series of films exploring the underbelly of the Copenhagen drug scene.

    Well that’s a lot of build-up to “Drive.” But here’s the thing, I’m not going to elaborate very specifically on this movie. Anyone who reveals too much is doing the movie a complete disservice. It is a film that is best left to unfold at its own pace with all surprises intact. The movie makes the most of its seedy Los Angeles setting. Gosling plays an unnamed stuntman who gets a sideline job working for a crime syndicate boss, played by an uncharacteristic Albert Brooks. All I will say is that things take an unexpected turn, and Gosling morphs from a virtually silent protagonist into a stone cold nightmare. It’s an exciting transformation and one that will linger with you. This is modern noir at its finest, but with a decidedly art-house vibe. It combines an edgy urban seventies sensibility with the man-with-no-name western allure. I think many expected “Drive” to be a car movie or a non-stop action picture, but it is essentially a slow-burn character driven piece about how far one man can be pushed. But make no mistake, it continues to ramp up to extreme proportions before the blood soaked finale.

    The filmmaking is top-notch throughout. There is an exquisite use of light, shadows, neon shadings, and arresting street level views of Los Angeles which make the visual appearance of the film quite spectacular. The odd techno-pop soundtrack is unorthodox, to be sure, but somehow fits perfectly. The editing and camera work is assured and edgy at the same time. And the effects are brutal and unforgettable. Add to that a great cast, and “Drive” becomes a can’t miss proposition. Gosling shows a different side here, but the performance everyone will talk about is served by Brooks. Brooks paints one of the most memorable villains on screen this year, completely against type, and will probably be looking at serious awards consideration. Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston, Ron Perlman and Christina Hendricks help round out the cast. “Drive,” ultimately, may not be for everyone and that’s OK. Winding Refn has put together a near perfect film for adult audiences. If you check your expectations at the door, don’t read spoilers, and settle in (oh and it helps if you aren’t particularly squeamish)–this is a ride well worth taking. KGHarris, 12/11.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? 


    |

    Comment Comments (7)

Comments are closed.