• Kiefer Sutherland (David)

  • Kiefer Sutherland (David)

    Before “The Lost Boys”‘ Sutherland was known primarily for being the son of Hollywood mainstay Donald Sutherland and for a bit part in ‘Stand By Me.’ After he played charismatic vampire gang leader David, however, Sutherland was a star, headlining such movies as “1969,” “Flashback,” “The Three Musketeers,” and “Eye for an Eye,” as well as vivid supporting turns in “Bright Lights, Big City,” the “Young Guns” movies, and “A Few Good Men.” In 2001, with his movie career deflating, he made himself an even bigger star as sleepless terrorist-fighter Jack Bauer on TV’s “24,” which lasted eight seasons. He’s reunited with “Lost Boys” director Joel Schumacher on several films, including “Flatliners” and “Phone Booth.” In 2012, the 45-year-old Sutherland returned to TV as the star of the drama “Touch” while developing a “24” feature film due next year.

  • Corey Feldman (Edgar Frog)

  • Corey Feldman (Edgar Frog)

    At 15, Corey Feldman was already the most established star in the “Lost Boys” cast, having worked on TV since age 3 and having co-starred in such hits as “Gremlins,” “The Goonies,” and “Stand By Me” (opposite “Lost Boys” antagonist Kiefer Sutherland). But the role of teen vampire hunter Edgar Frog pushed him to a new level of fame. His chemistry with co-star Corey Haim made both into teen heartthrobs, a status they exploited on seven more films together, including “License to Drive” and “Dream a Little Dream.” Away from Haim, Feldman continued to score in such films as “The Burbs” and as the voice of Donatello in the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” live-action films. Both Coreys saw their fame wane as they grew older and less adorable. Feldman kept his career alive via reality TV, even getting married to Susie Sprague during an episode of “The Surreal Life” in 2002. (They split seven years later.) Feldman showcased his friendship with Haim during two seasons of “The Two Coreys,” a show meant to chronicle the pair’s efforts to make a sequel to “The Lost Boys” (“The Lost Boys: The Tribe” went straight to video in 2008, followed by “The Lost Boys: The Thirst” in 2010) but ended up tracing Feldman’s efforts to keep Haim clean and sober. Now 41, Feldman will be seen later this year in horror film “The Zombie King” opposite another former child star, “Terminator 2″ alumnus Edward Furlong.

  • Corey Haim

    Before “The Lost Boys,” Haim had horror cred from his appearances in the thriller “Firstborn” (his debut film, at age 13, in 1984) and Stephen King’s “Silver Bullet” (1985). In 1986, “Lucas” marked his first starring role, an acclaimed performance as a sensitive, undersized teen. It’s also where he was introduced to beer, beginning a cycle of alcohol and substance abuse against which he would fight in vain for the rest of his life. His role as Sam, who must rescue his big brother and his mother from vampires in “The Lost Boys,” brought him new fame and the beginning of a lifelong friendship and professional partnership with Corey Feldman. Haim had some minor hits on his own, including the horror film “Watchers” and the crime caper “Fast Getaway,” but otherwise had little success outside such Two Coreys projects as “License to Drive” and “Dream a Little Dream.” Despite frequent relapses into addiction, he worked steadily throughout the ’90s, but by 2000, years of abuse had taken their toll on his body and his finances, and he became a recluse. His attempt at a comeback was documented in the reality series “The Two Coreys,” which also showed yet another slide into addiction and a rupture in his friendship with Feldman. His role in 2008’s direct-to-DVD sequel “The Lost Boys: The Tribe” was reduced to a closing-credits cameo. Near the end of his life, he seemed to be getting back on track, with a bit part in 2009’s “Crank: High Voltage” and a reconciliation with Feldman. The Coreys were said to be developing a “License to Drive” sequel when Haim died of pneumonia in 2010. He was 38.

  • Jason Patric (Michael)

  • Jason Patric (Michael)

    The son of playwright/”Exorcist” star Jason Miller and grandson of Jackie Gleason, Patric made his film debut in the 1987 sci-fi feature “Solarbabies” opposite future “Lost Boys” love interest Jami Gertz. Still, he was all but unknown before he landed the starring role of Michael, a teen fighting his own slide into vampirism, in his second film. “The Lost Boys” made him famous, as did his two-year romance with Julia Roberts (who, in 1991, notoriously left her fiancé, Patric’s pal and “Lost Boys” co-star Kiefer Sutherland, just days before their wedding and ran off to Ireland with Patric). Over the next decade, Patric became known for intense performances in such grim dramas as “Rush,” “Geronimo: An American Legend,” “The Journey of August King,” “Your Friends & Neighbors,” and “Narc.” His most mainstream film, the 1997 sequel “Speed 2: Cruise Control,” was a notorious flop from which his career never really recovered, though he has continued to work steadily in lower-profile movies such as “In the Valley of Elah” and “The Losers.” The 46-year-old’s most recent role was in the 2012 Canadian film “Keyhole.” Last year, he and Sutherland appeared on Broadway in a revival of Patric’s father’s play “That Championship Season.” Bygones!

  • Jamison Newlander (Alan Frog)

  • Jamison Newlander (Alan Frog)

    Newlander was another unknown who made his film debut in “The Lost Boys” as Edgar Frog’s equally intense vampire-hunting brother, Alan Frog. Upstaged by the two Coreys, he nonetheless parlayed his “Lost Boys” performance into another horror film role in 1988’s “The Blob.” He’s spent most of the last quarter century as a stage actor, though he did write, direct, and star in two short films (“Rooster” and “Room Service”) that played the festival circuit. He reprised his role as Alan Frog in the 2008 straight-to-video sequel “The Lost Boys: The Tribe,” but his scenes were relegated to the outtakes reel. The actor, now 42, fared better in the 2010 sequel “The Lost Boys: The Thirst.” In a 2010 interview, Newlander said he was busy writing screenplays and creating a series of webisodes for Warner Bros., the studio behind the “Lost Boys” franchise.

  • Jami Gertz (Star)

  • Jami Gertz (Star)

    Before playing Star, Michael’s half-vampire/biker chick love interest in “The Lost Boys,” Gertz was known for playing snobby teen princesses on TV’s “Square Pegs” and “The Facts of Life,” as well as in a small role in the movie “Sixteen Candles.” 1987 also saw her play a more adult version of her typical character in the glossy film version of “Less Than Zero.” After “Lost Boys,” her films included crime drama “Renegades” (reuniting her with “Lost Boys” co-star Kiefer Sutherland) and “Twister,” but she spent most of her time on TV, earning kudos for lively guest spots on “Seinfeld” and “Ally McBeal” and a four-year starring role on the sitcom “Still Standing” (2002-06). Now 46, she most recently appeared in a guest role on “Modern Family” in 2011. She was also one of the producers of last year’s Oscar-nominated film “A Better Life.”

  • Chance Michael Corbitt (Laddie)

  • Chance Michael Corbitt (Laddie)

    Corbitt was 10 when he made his film debut in “Lost Boys” as Laddie, the Eddie Munster-ish half-vampire kid. He followed that with a role in another horror film, the cult favorite “Pumpkinhead.” He disappeared from showbiz after his brief run in the early ’90s as David Hasselhoff’s son on “Baywatch.” But the 36-year-old is due back on screen this October in the horror movie “Hallow’s Eve.”

  • Dianne Wiest (Lucy)

  • Dianne Wiest (Lucy)

    Wiest has won Oscars for her flamboyant roles in two Woody Allen movies (1986’s “Hannah and Her Sisters” and 1994’s “Bullets Over Broadway”), but “Lost Boys” (made after she’d worked on four consecutive Allen movies) saw her revert to type as frazzled mom Lucy, the sort of role she’d played in “Footloose” and would play again in such films as “Parenthood,” “Edward Scissorhands,” “Cops and Robbersons,” “The Birdcage,” and “Rabbit Hole.” On TV, she was a series regular on “Law & Order” and “In Treatment.” The 64-year-old actress appeared earlier this year in the movie “Darling Companion” and will be seen again in August in the family film “The Odd Life of Timothy Green.”

  • Edward Herrmann (Max)

  • Edward Herrmann (Max)

    Herrmann is known for playing buttoned-down patricians (he played Franklin D. Roosevelt several times, most famously in the movie “Annie”). His image allowed him to play against type as Max, Lucy’s mild-mannered suitor, whom her sons and the Frog brothers suspect of being the secret leader of the local vampires. Since “Lost Boys,” he’s continued to play starchy aristocrats in such films as “Overboard,” “Richie Rich,” and “Intolerable Cruelty,” as well as on the 2000-07 run of TV’s “Gilmore Girls,” as Rory’s old-money grandfather. Herrmann, who turned 69 on July 21, guest-starred in recurring roles this year on legal dramas “The Good Wife” and “Harry’s Law.” His next movie is the upcoming “Doorway to Heaven.

  • Alex Winter (Marko)

    The child of professional dancers, Winter appeared in several Broadway plays and a handful of movies (starting with 1985’s “Death Wish 3″) before earning his big break as vampire Marko in “The Lost Boys.” From there, he went on to greater fame alongside Keanu Reeves as time-traveling headbangers in the two “Bill and Ted” movies. But Winter preferred being behind the camera as a filmmaker. In the 1990s, he wrote and directed two acclaimed cult movies, “Freaked” and “Fever.” In recent years, he’s been a regular on TV as a director and voiceover actor on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim shows. Having turned 47 on July 17, Winter has said he and Reeves are developing a third “Bill and Ted” movie, with the script already completed.

  • Barnard Hughes

    Hughes was known to film audiences for playing cranky, grandfatherly types, though probably none more eccentric than the taxidermy-loving Grandpa in “The Lost Boys.” A stage actor who boasted more than 400 theatrical credits, he was best known for his Tony-winning role as an Irish father in “Da,” a role he reprised on film in 1988. Other post-“Lost Boys” film roles included “Doc Hollywood,” “Sister Act 2,” and “The Fantasticks.” On TV, where he’d played a recurring role as Bob’s father on “The Bob Newhard Show,” Hughes would go on to play regulars on “The Cavanaughs” and “Blossom.” His last TV role was a guest spot on “Deadline” in 2000, when he was 85. Hughes died at age 90 in 2006.

  • Joel Schumacher

    “The Lost Boys” was orignially supposed to be a “Goonies”-like, family-friendly adventure with an all-kid cast. But Schumacher, coming off the Brat Pack hit “St. Elmo’s Fire,” agreed to take over the long-gestating project only if he could make it a darker, sexier story by having the characters rewritten as teenagers. The success of those two mid-’80s movies established Schumacher ever after as a director who could launch the careers of talented, little-known young actors, a reputation he maintained with such films as “Flatliners,” “The Client,” “A Time to Kill,” “Tigerland,” and most recently, 2010’s “Twelve.” His best known movies remain his two notoriously campy Bat-sequels, “Batman Forever” and “Batman & Robin.” While he’s tried a number of genres, from romance (“Cousins”) to biopic (“Victoria Guerin”) to musical (“The Phantom of the Opera”), he tends to make thrillers, such as “Falling Down,” “8MM,” “Phone Booth,” and “The Number 23.” He returned to vampires with 2009’s “Blood Creek,” starring Michael Fassbender. The 73-year-old’s most recent movie was the 2011 thriller “Trespass,” with Nicole Kidman and Nicolas Cage.

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