Real Steel (Three-Disc Combo: Blu-ray/DVD + Digital Copy)

Real Steel (Three-Disc Combo: Blu-ray/DVD + Digital Copy)

– click on the image below for more information.

Real Steel (Three-Disc Combo: Blu-ray/DVD + Digital Copy)

Sometime in the not-too-distant future, boxing has been outlawed and replaced by fighting matches with robots. Big robots. Hulking, rock ’em, sock ’em mechanical robots. But if those machines are cutting edge, Real Steel sticks to an old-fashioned style of storytelling, with a tale of a down-and-out fight manager (Hugh Jackman) looking for a good ‘bot to get back in the game, and get back out of debt. Hearts are further tugged by the arrival of this guy’s 11-year-old son (Dakota Goyo), who hasn’

Real Steel (Three-Disc Combo: Blu-ray/DVD + Digital Copy)

Click on the button for more information and reviews.

Top MOvie Today

2 thoughts on “Real Steel (Three-Disc Combo: Blu-ray/DVD + Digital Copy)

  1. 8 of 9 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The best – action for husbands and a tear jerker for wives, October 11, 2011
    By 
    Barn

    This review is from: Real Steel (DVD)

    Technically a Sci-Fi movie, this movie is really a story of a father redeeming his relationship with a son he never knew, and of the character change that occurs in the father throughout the movie. The story is very well told, drawing you into the characters experiences, and although my wife loathes Sci-Fi movies, she loved this movie and cried during some scenes. It’s got a lot action in it as well and is fun to watch. I do not watch many movies twice, but I’ll be buying this movie and we’ll be enjoying it repeatedly. The robot they prepare together serves as a device for a David and Goliath storyline as well. Hard to believe when reading this, but you’ll be cheering for the father and son and their robot as well.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? 


    |

    Comment Comments (3)

  2. 39 of 45 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Mix Rocky with Paper Moon, add in robots, and voila! A really fun, highly enjoyable hit of a movie, October 13, 2011
    By 
    Whitt Patrick Pond “Whitt” (Cambridge, MA United States) –
      

      

    This review is from: Real Steel (Three-Disc Combo: Blu-ray/DVD + Digital Copy) (Blu-ray)

    Real Steel, directed by Shawn Levy, is one of the very few movies I’ve seen in recent years where the audience I was in actually broke into applause in various scenes. A masterfully done tale of underdogs – a boy and his dad and a discarded robot – going against the odds, it really does get you pumped up to that level. I got a bigger kick out of this movie than I have from any other this year. It really is that much fun to watch.

    The germ idea for Real Steel comes from a 1956 short story by Richard Matheson that was made into a classic Twilight Zone episode, and the look is right out of the Transformers franchise, but the heart – and there’s a lot of it in this film – comes in equal measure from two films one would ordinarily have never linked together: John Avildsen’s boxing classic Rocky (1976) and Peter Bogdanovich’s Depression-era con-man & kid road trip classic Paper Moon (1973).

    The plot is set in the not so distant future of 2020, where human boxing has been completely displaced by robot boxing. Charlie Kenton (Hugh Jackman), a former boxer who now gets by “managing” a robot boxer named Ambush, is about as down on his luck as it gets. Deep in debt and barely able to keep Ambush functional, Charlie is reduced to working the fringes of the boxing circuit and even exhibiting Ambush in county fairs where he puts the robot up against things like wild bulls. Which turns out to be a really bad idea when Ambush ends up getting smashed to pieces by a bull that weighs almost three times what he had agreed to, leaving Charlie fleeing in his van afterwards to avoid the exhibition promoter (Kevin Durand) to whom he now owes twenty thousand dollars. In this opening scene, we learn two things that tell us why Charlie is in the straits he’s in: (1) he frequently makes really bad decisions, especially when he’s desperate, and (2) he lets himself get distracted instead of keeping his mind on what he’s doing – a bad thing to have happen when your robot is fighting a two-and-a-half ton bull.

    Shortly after this disaster, while wondering how he’s going to be able to afford another robot, Charlie unexpectedly finds out that an old ex-girlfriend of his has died, leaving behind an eleven-year-old boy named Max (Dakota Goyo), a son Charlie hasn’t seen since he was an infant. Thinking that it’s just a matter of signing over custody to the boy’s aunt Debra (Hope Davis) and her new husband Marvin (James Rebhorn), Charlie shows up at the courthouse, only to quickly realize that Marvin is rich and that the opportunity he’s been needing has landed right in his lap. Abruptly seeming to change his mind about signing the boy over, Charlie privately talks Marvin into an agreement where he’ll give up custody rights to the boy, but only for $100K. Not wild about adopting Max to begin with, Marvin grudgingly agrees, but only on the condition that Charlie keep the boy for the next three months so that the kid doesn’t interfere with his plans for their summer vacation in Europe. Charlie, not wild about being saddled with a kid, reluctantly agrees, getting half the money up front, the other half to be handed over when he delivers the kid at the end of the summer. The deal done, Marvin departs with Debra, leaving Charlie face-to-face with Max for the first time. And clearly, neither of them are thrilled by this arrangement. Max is even less thrilled when he finds out that he’s been “sold” to his aunt and uncle and angrily demands that Charlie give him half the money. Which Charlie can’t because he’s already spent most of it buying a replacement robot named Noisy Boy. Seem familiar? It’s right out of Paper Moon, as are some other key moments in the film.)

    Charlie takes Max to an old boxing gym that now serves largely as a repair shop for robot boxers, run by his friend Bailey Tallet (Evangeline Lily). The two of them have history together as Bailey’s father was Max’s trainer back in the days when Max was a boxer and the boxing gym was still a boxing gym. Bailey knows Max better than he knows himself, and she’s the first one to recognize just how much Max and Charlie are alike. But the similarities quickly come out when Noisy Boy is delivered and Max stares at the robot with fanboy adoration, rattling off a string of fight statistics that even Charlie wasn’t aware of. He also turns out to know the Japanese commands needed to operate Noisy Boy from all of the video games he’s played.

    Things finally seem to be looking up and Charlie gets an old fight promoting friend Finn (Anthony Mackie) to get Noisy Boy on the evening’s fight card at the local arena. But once again, Charlie’s hopes are dashed by bad decisions and not keeping his mind on what he’s doing. Faced with once again having to try to come up with a robot but with no money to pay for one, Charlie takes Max along as he night-raids a junkyard looking for robot parts. As they wander through the place in the…

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? 


    |

    Comment Comments (4)

Comments are closed.